Stock Photo – Raspberry ripple cupcakes

Word of the Year Our Word of the Year choice serves as a symbol of each year’s most meaningful events and lookup trends. It is an opportunity for us to reflect on the language and ideas that represented each year. So, take a stroll down memory lane stock Photo – Raspberry ripple cupcakes remember all of our past Word of the Year selections. Change It wasn’t trendy, funny, nor was it coined on Twitter, but we thought change told a real story about how our users defined 2010.

The national debate can arguably be summarized by the question: In the past two years, has there been enough change? Meanwhile, many Americans continue to face change in their homes, bank accounts and jobs. Only time will tell if the latest wave of change Americans voted for in the midterm elections will result in a negative or positive outcome. Tergiversate This rare word was chosen to represent 2011 because it described so much of the world around us. Tergiversate means “to change repeatedly one’s attitude or opinions with respect to a cause, subject, etc. Bluster In a year known for the Occupy movement and what became known as the Arab Spring, our lexicographers chose bluster as their Word of the Year for 2012. 2012 saw the most expensive political campaigns and some of the most extreme weather events in human history, from floods in Australia to cyclones in China to Hurricane Sandy and many others.

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Privacy We got serious in 2013. Privacy was on everyone’s mind that year, from Edward Snowden’s reveal of Project PRISM to the arrival of Google Glass. Exposure Spoiler alert: Things don’t get less serious in 2014. Our Word of the Year was exposure, which highlighted the year’s Ebola virus outbreak, shocking acts of violence both abroad and in the US, and widespread theft of personal information. From the pervading sense of vulnerability surrounding Ebola to the visibility into acts of crime or misconduct that ignited critical conversations about race, gender, and violence, various senses of exposure were out in the open this year. Identity Fluidity of identity was a huge theme in 2015.

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Language around gender and sexual identity broadened, becoming more inclusive with additions to the dictionary like gender-fluid as well as the gender-neutral prefix Mx. Xenophobia In 2016, we selected xenophobia as our Word of the Year. Fear of the “other” was a huge theme in 2016, from Brexit to President Donald Trump’s campaign rhetoric. Despite being chosen as the 2016 Word of the Year, xenophobia is not to be celebrated. Rather it’s a word to reflect upon deeply in light of the events of the recent past.

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Complicit The word complicit sprung up in conversations in 2017 about those who spoke out against powerful figures and institutions and about those who stayed silent. It was a year of real awakening to complicity in various sectors of society, from politics to pop culture. Our choice for Word of the Year is as much about what is visible as it is about what is not. It’s a word that reminds us that even inaction is a type of action.

The silent acceptance of wrongdoing is how we’ve gotten to this point. We must not let this continue to be the norm. If we do, then we are all complicit. The Roman Numeral Bowl: Are You Ready For Some Football? Where Do Our Favorite Emoji Come From? Start your day with weird words, fun quizzes, and language stories. This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

This iframe contains the logic required to handle Ajax powered Gravity Forms. This may not seem like much to you my dear readers, but to me it is phenomenal! I have at long last, at LONG last, succeeded in making tablet! One of the first posts on Cakeyboi was my failure at making tablet. And to be honest, I have tried before then and a few times since. Armed with yet another recipe I found online and with a couple of tweaks, tablet was finally made. For those not in the know, tablet is a treat, Scottish in origin, which lies somewhere near fudge and toffee on the confectioner line up.

Yet, it’s not chewy or brittle like some toffees, nor is it as soft as fudge. It’s sort of crumbly with  a vanilla, sweet, buttery taste. Having said this, the recipe I followed did not use butter, so maybe it’s not real tablet, but it certainly tasted like it and has the same texture. This is definitely for the sweet of tooth. Once tried, you will be a convert.

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In a large pan place the sugar and 120ml of milk, heat slowly until the sugar has dissolved. Add the tin of condensed milk and bring this to the boil, keep it boiling for 15 to 20 minutes. The mixture will start off a very pale golden colour and turn amber during the process. Don’t stir either when boiling, just keep an eye on it. The mixture will have become darker as I said and will appear thicker. Beat it hard and fast for at least 5 minutes.

I broke my whisk doing this FYI. The mixture will become even thicker and lighten slightly in colour again. I knew it was ready when I saw wisps of the mixture on the side of the pan crystallise. Pour into the prepared pan and allow this to cool for 10 minutes before scoring the mixture into pieces, with a knife. It’s a sweet and comforting treat, which is a nice alternative to toffee or fudge.

And goes great with a cup of coffee. I hope it works for you too! Oh look at that perfect wrinkle on the top of your tray of tablet! I’ve never managed to make it either but the recipes I’ve seen also use condensed milk so I think you are on safe ground.

Looks and sounds a lot like my grandmother’s Penuche recipe although that uses a bit of corn syrup and butter rather than the sweetened condensed milk. I will certainly have to give this ago. Fudge is another problem area for me Angela, going to give that another go too soon! Difficult one to try and explain Eileen – but it’s all about texture I think, mostly.

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The taste is different too, but tablet cannot be beaten! I can’t wait to try your recipe and see how it compares! I love tablet but I haven’t eaten any for years. I used to know someone who regularly made batches using her mother’s recipe but would never tell me how to make it.

Having read your description, I think she might have kept it to herself on health and safety grounds. I’m a huge tablet fan but I’ve never made any. I hope it works well for you Polly! I brought the whole mixture to the boil, it burnt horribly. Any idea how I can prevent this while allowing it to bubble enough? Hi – I’m so sorry you had this problem.

Tablet making is so temperamental and can vary each time you make it. I would suggest using the thickest based pan you have and using a lower temperature – low and slow is the way to go plus lots of patience. You may need to adjust my timings. Let me know how it goes next time. I guess I was a bit too impatient the last time. Although only took 10 mins to turn amber.

Glad it worked for Karen – it can be such a temperamental thing tablet! I made this for my mom and her Scottish sisters and it disappeared in about 4 minutes! Going to make more for a party tomorrow and for Christmas! Thank you I followed your instructions step by step! After leaving it to cool, it doesn’t have the texture of tablet, more like fudge. Tastes great, but not hard enough. Should I cook it longer, maybe darker.

Hi, sorry to hear it didn’t work for you. It can be temperamental, but persevere. As you can see from some of the comments above, it can work. I would try beating it for a good long while after making it, lots of elbow grease to incorporate air into the mix.

Eventually drops on the side of the pan begin to set and crystallise and that’s when you know it’s ready. Let me know if this works for you. Can you use an electric whisk instead? You could, but please be very careful!

If it splatters you will sore! Here in Germany I cannot get sweetened condensed milk, any alternative? About 5 minutes into beating it started expanding and setting! I boiling it for too long maybe? Hi Alison – it possibly could be.

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Tablet is so temperamental and it could be down to how heavy your pot is, perhaps it doesn’t need as long. Try reducing the boiling time and watch as it turns more amber in colour that is always a good indicator of how quickly it is getting there. You can stir it during the boiling stage. It will help to stop it burning.

Take it off the heat at this point and start to beat it for 5 mins. Also you don’t need to use a whisk to beat it – too flimsy for the thick mixture. Hi – Just plain white granulated sugar. I love your feedback and really do appreciate it.

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Word of the Year Our Word of the Year choice serves as a symbol of each year’s most meaningful events and lookup trends. It is an opportunity for us to reflect on the language and ideas that represented each year. So, take a stroll down memory lane to remember all of our past Word of the Year selections. Change It wasn’t trendy, funny, nor was it coined on Twitter, but we thought change told a real story about how our users defined 2010.

The national debate can arguably be summarized by the question: In the past two years, has there been enough change? Meanwhile, many Americans continue to face change in their homes, bank accounts and jobs. Only time will tell if the latest wave of change Americans voted for in the midterm elections will result in a negative or positive outcome. Tergiversate This rare word was chosen to represent 2011 because it described so much of the world around us. Tergiversate means “to change repeatedly one’s attitude or opinions with respect to a cause, subject, etc. Bluster In a year known for the Occupy movement and what became known as the Arab Spring, our lexicographers chose bluster as their Word of the Year for 2012. 2012 saw the most expensive political campaigns and some of the most extreme weather events in human history, from floods in Australia to cyclones in China to Hurricane Sandy and many others.

Privacy We got serious in 2013. Privacy was on everyone’s mind that year, from Edward Snowden’s reveal of Project PRISM to the arrival of Google Glass. Exposure Spoiler alert: Things don’t get less serious in 2014. Our Word of the Year was exposure, which highlighted the year’s Ebola virus outbreak, shocking acts of violence both abroad and in the US, and widespread theft of personal information.

From the pervading sense of vulnerability surrounding Ebola to the visibility into acts of crime or misconduct that ignited critical conversations about race, gender, and violence, various senses of exposure were out in the open this year. Identity Fluidity of identity was a huge theme in 2015. Language around gender and sexual identity broadened, becoming more inclusive with additions to the dictionary like gender-fluid as well as the gender-neutral prefix Mx. Xenophobia In 2016, we selected xenophobia as our Word of the Year. Fear of the “other” was a huge theme in 2016, from Brexit to President Donald Trump’s campaign rhetoric. Despite being chosen as the 2016 Word of the Year, xenophobia is not to be celebrated. Rather it’s a word to reflect upon deeply in light of the events of the recent past.

Complicit The word complicit sprung up in conversations in 2017 about those who spoke out against powerful figures and institutions and about those who stayed silent. It was a year of real awakening to complicity in various sectors of society, from politics to pop culture. Our choice for Word of the Year is as much about what is visible as it is about what is not. It’s a word that reminds us that even inaction is a type of action. The silent acceptance of wrongdoing is how we’ve gotten to this point.

We must not let this continue to be the norm. If we do, then we are all complicit. The Roman Numeral Bowl: Are You Ready For Some Football? Where Do Our Favorite Emoji Come From? Start your day with weird words, fun quizzes, and language stories. This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged. This iframe contains the logic required to handle Ajax powered Gravity Forms.

This may not seem like much to you my dear readers, but to me it is phenomenal! I have at long last, at LONG last, succeeded in making tablet! One of the first posts on Cakeyboi was my failure at making tablet. And to be honest, I have tried before then and a few times since.

Armed with yet another recipe I found online and with a couple of tweaks, tablet was finally made. For those not in the know, tablet is a treat, Scottish in origin, which lies somewhere near fudge and toffee on the confectioner line up. Yet, it’s not chewy or brittle like some toffees, nor is it as soft as fudge. It’s sort of crumbly with  a vanilla, sweet, buttery taste. Having said this, the recipe I followed did not use butter, so maybe it’s not real tablet, but it certainly tasted like it and has the same texture. This is definitely for the sweet of tooth. Once tried, you will be a convert.