Questions & Answers for: cryptoquote solver

I’ve been teaching social networking concepts in my Social Media class at Shepherd University for the past several years. And it is something that students have always seemed to struggle with or not take a great deal of interest in. Questions & Answers for: cryptoquote solver is unfortunate, because these are really important concepts for our social media students to be learning. So this semester, I wanted to try and see if I could make it a little more fun and thus succeed in making the concepts a little more sticky.

Here’s what I came up with. That is, strong ties and weak ties. I also wanted students to get a small sense of visualizing their networks, though I didn’t get into any concepts of data visualization that I’ve been learning in my free time this semester. At the start of class, I asked students to write out the names of the last 10 people they talked to on the left side of a blank sheet of paper.

In a column to the right, I asked them to write what their relationship was with each person in the last. For example, was that your roommate, your brother, your best friend, your professor? I then asked the students to flip the paper over. I told them to then draw a line from 1 person to another if person 1 knows person 2. I gave them a few minutes to do this. For other students, little clusters emerged.

Example: I introduced Mom to my wife. After, I returned students and asked them to write any social object they have in common with the people directly connected to them. Examples may include: hobbies, this class, music, movies, sports, books, etc. They had fun thinking of this. What I put for my Mom?

And I told them in cases like that, probably you talk about family matters broadly. Which person is more important for spreading NEW information to as many people as possible? And, I explain that the answer is B, though it may be counter-intuitive. I explain the strength of weak ties, and that strong ties tend to share similar information so there is a lot of redundancy. After some fun discussion about how all of these concepts we have discussed relate to what they drew on their network map, we move on to the last, and probably most fun part! But, let me say again, that being able to look down at your own map as a student illustrates these concepts in a way that is relatable to the student. It occurs in their very own life.

Students get to call out examples of the concepts from their own networks. Okay, on to that last fun part I promised. Next, I find 3 students in the class who don’t know one another outside of the class. This was easy to do in a class of 16. I give each a marker and ask them to draw their network on the white board so that each is next to each other.

For time purposes, I don’t have them bother with the arrows or naming the social objects. If you have a large enough space, all 3 can work at the same time. If you know that any person on the board knows another person who is on the board, then please come up and grab a marker and draw a line between them to connect them. Example: Jon is is one student’s network on the board. Sally is in another student’s network on the board.

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And a student in your class knows that Jon knows Sally. She gets up and draws a line connecting Jon and Sally, thus connecting the two separate networks. Want to see what our network looked like? Several students snapped photos so they could show others. In summary, this activity brought to life concepts that students in past semesters seemed less interested in.

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The trick was that the assignment was about the students and their lives. They learned something that directly applies to them, and they could see it directly as they were learning it. If you’d like to see the slides for this entire lecture, I’ve uploaded them to my account on slideshare. Nicely done and can be used at the high school level as well.

Great ideas and thanks for sharing this! Kaplan, Thank you so much for your comment. I am glad you enjoyed the post. Let me know how it goes!

Notify me of follow-up comments by email. Notify me of new posts by email. This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed. Missed the Social Network Analysis Basics Webinar?

Hubspot Academy, Google Analytics, Meltwater software and more! A Social Media Education Blog by Matthew J. Sorry, your blog cannot share posts by email. I’ve been teaching social networking concepts in my Social Media class at Shepherd University for the past several years. And it is something that students have always seemed to struggle with or not take a great deal of interest in. This is unfortunate, because these are really important concepts for our social media students to be learning. So this semester, I wanted to try and see if I could make it a little more fun and thus succeed in making the concepts a little more sticky.

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Here’s what I came up with. That is, strong ties and weak ties. I also wanted students to get a small sense of visualizing their networks, though I didn’t get into any concepts of data visualization that I’ve been learning in my free time this semester. At the start of class, I asked students to write out the names of the last 10 people they talked to on the left side of a blank sheet of paper.

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In a column to the right, I asked them to write what their relationship was with each person in the last. For example, was that your roommate, your brother, your best friend, your professor? I then asked the students to flip the paper over. I told them to then draw a line from 1 person to another if person 1 knows person 2.

I gave them a few minutes to do this. For other students, little clusters emerged. Example: I introduced Mom to my wife. After, I returned students and asked them to write any social object they have in common with the people directly connected to them. Examples may include: hobbies, this class, music, movies, sports, books, etc. They had fun thinking of this. What I put for my Mom?

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And I told them in cases like that, probably you talk about family matters broadly. Which person is more important for spreading NEW information to as many people as possible? And, I explain that the answer is B, though it may be counter-intuitive. I explain the strength of weak ties, and that strong ties tend to share similar information so there is a lot of redundancy. After some fun discussion about how all of these concepts we have discussed relate to what they drew on their network map, we move on to the last, and probably most fun part! But, let me say again, that being able to look down at your own map as a student illustrates these concepts in a way that is relatable to the student. It occurs in their very own life.

Students get to call out examples of the concepts from their own networks. Okay, on to that last fun part I promised. Next, I find 3 students in the class who don’t know one another outside of the class. This was easy to do in a class of 16. I give each a marker and ask them to draw their network on the white board so that each is next to each other. For time purposes, I don’t have them bother with the arrows or naming the social objects. If you have a large enough space, all 3 can work at the same time.

If you know that any person on the board knows another person who is on the board, then please come up and grab a marker and draw a line between them to connect them. Example: Jon is is one student’s network on the board. Sally is in another student’s network on the board. And a student in your class knows that Jon knows Sally. She gets up and draws a line connecting Jon and Sally, thus connecting the two separate networks. Want to see what our network looked like? Several students snapped photos so they could show others.

In summary, this activity brought to life concepts that students in past semesters seemed less interested in. The trick was that the assignment was about the students and their lives. They learned something that directly applies to them, and they could see it directly as they were learning it. If you’d like to see the slides for this entire lecture, I’ve uploaded them to my account on slideshare. Nicely done and can be used at the high school level as well. Great ideas and thanks for sharing this! Kaplan, Thank you so much for your comment.

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I am glad you enjoyed the post. Let me know how it goes! Notify me of follow-up comments by email. Notify me of new posts by email.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed. Missed the Social Network Analysis Basics Webinar? Hubspot Academy, Google Analytics, Meltwater software and more! A Social Media Education Blog by Matthew J. Sorry, your blog cannot share posts by email. I’ve been teaching social networking concepts in my Social Media class at Shepherd University for the past several years.

And it is something that students have always seemed to struggle with or not take a great deal of interest in. This is unfortunate, because these are really important concepts for our social media students to be learning. So this semester, I wanted to try and see if I could make it a little more fun and thus succeed in making the concepts a little more sticky. Here’s what I came up with. That is, strong ties and weak ties. I also wanted students to get a small sense of visualizing their networks, though I didn’t get into any concepts of data visualization that I’ve been learning in my free time this semester. At the start of class, I asked students to write out the names of the last 10 people they talked to on the left side of a blank sheet of paper.

In a column to the right, I asked them to write what their relationship was with each person in the last. For example, was that your roommate, your brother, your best friend, your professor? I then asked the students to flip the paper over. I told them to then draw a line from 1 person to another if person 1 knows person 2. I gave them a few minutes to do this.

For other students, little clusters emerged. Example: I introduced Mom to my wife. After, I returned students and asked them to write any social object they have in common with the people directly connected to them. Examples may include: hobbies, this class, music, movies, sports, books, etc. They had fun thinking of this. What I put for my Mom? And I told them in cases like that, probably you talk about family matters broadly.

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Which person is more important for spreading NEW information to as many people as possible? And, I explain that the answer is B, though it may be counter-intuitive. I explain the strength of weak ties, and that strong ties tend to share similar information so there is a lot of redundancy. After some fun discussion about how all of these concepts we have discussed relate to what they drew on their network map, we move on to the last, and probably most fun part! But, let me say again, that being able to look down at your own map as a student illustrates these concepts in a way that is relatable to the student. It occurs in their very own life. Students get to call out examples of the concepts from their own networks.

Okay, on to that last fun part I promised. Next, I find 3 students in the class who don’t know one another outside of the class. This was easy to do in a class of 16. I give each a marker and ask them to draw their network on the white board so that each is next to each other. For time purposes, I don’t have them bother with the arrows or naming the social objects. If you have a large enough space, all 3 can work at the same time.

If you know that any person on the board knows another person who is on the board, then please come up and grab a marker and draw a line between them to connect them. Example: Jon is is one student’s network on the board. Sally is in another student’s network on the board. And a student in your class knows that Jon knows Sally. She gets up and draws a line connecting Jon and Sally, thus connecting the two separate networks. Want to see what our network looked like? Several students snapped photos so they could show others.

In summary, this activity brought to life concepts that students in past semesters seemed less interested in. The trick was that the assignment was about the students and their lives. They learned something that directly applies to them, and they could see it directly as they were learning it. If you’d like to see the slides for this entire lecture, I’ve uploaded them to my account on slideshare. Nicely done and can be used at the high school level as well. Great ideas and thanks for sharing this!

Kaplan, Thank you so much for your comment. I am glad you enjoyed the post. Let me know how it goes! Notify me of follow-up comments by email. Notify me of new posts by email.