Afghans, Page 12

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This article possibly contains original research. This article is about Afghan immigrants in Pakistan. It is not to be confused with the Pashtuns of Pakistan. The first wave of Afghan refugees to Pakistan began during the Soviet war in Afghanistan in the late 1970s. By the end of 2001, there were over four million.

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Most have returned to Afghanistan since 2002. The UNHCR reported in February 2017 that about 1. They are primarily Afghanistan’s Pashtuns, followed by Tajiks, Hazaras, Uzbeks, Baloch and Turkmen. The border between Afghanistan and Pakistan is the Durand Line. Afghans have migrated from Afghanistan to what is now Pakistan since at least the times of the Ghaznavids in the 10th century. Interaction and migration by the region’s native people were common.

During the 1980s Soviet war in Afghanistan, many Afghans left their country. After the September 11 attacks, when US-led forces began bombing al-Qaeda and Taliban targets in Afghanistan, a small number of Afghans fled into Pakistan. 3 million Afghans were repatriated from Pakistan through the UNHCR since March 2002. In 2005 the government of Pakistan began registering Afghans, and the number of registered Afghans was reported at 2. More than 357,000 Afghans were repatriated from Pakistan in 2007, and Afghans were repatriated between March and October of each subsequent year.

In June 2010 Pakistan ratified the United Nations Convention against Torture, which forbids member states from deporting, extraditing or returning people where there is reason to believe they will be tortured. Between 2010 and the end of 2012, a reported 229,000 Afghan refugees returned from Pakistan. Some Pakistani officials have estimated that 400,000 non-registered Afghans may be living in their country. A total of 380,884 Afghan refugees left Pakistan for Afghanistan in 2016.

Most were born and raised in Pakistan, but are still counted as citizens of Afghanistan. 3 million registered Afghans still remained in Pakistan. A number of Afghan passport holders travel to Pakistan with a visa for a variety of reasons, including family visits, business, medical purposes, sport competitions, education, tourism, or to visit foreign embassies. Since the 1980s, Afghans and Pakistanis were accustomed to crossing the border between their countries without passports or visas.

In March 2012, Pakistan ended its visa-extension program. Karim Sadiq of the Afghanistan national cricket team lived in Pakistan. Hasti Gul, another member of the Afghanistan national cricket team, lived in Peshawar. Eighty-five percent of Afghan refugees in Pakistan are Pashtuns, and the remaining 15 percent are Uzbeks, Tajiks and members of other ethnic groups. During the 1980s Soviet war in Afganistan, Peshawar was a center for Afghan refugees.

Most Afghans in Quetta are engaged in business and work in the city. Balochistan shares demographics with Afghanistan, and many refugees have migrated to the province for ethnic links. The first wave of Afghan Hazaras arrived during the 1980s Soviet war, and more arrived fleeing persecution by the Taliban regime in the 1990s. According to the UNHCR and local law enforcement, about 50,000 Afghan refugees lived in Sindh in 2009. A UNHCR spokesman said, “Sindh is home to some 50,000 Afghan refugees and most of them are staying in Karachi”. Before 2006 about 25,000 Afghans lived in a refugee camp in the Islamabad Capital Territory.

The camp was closed, its refugees relocated and 7,335 Afghans were reportedly living in Rawalpindi. An estimated 150,000 Afghans live in Pakistan’s Punjab province. During the 1980s, about 13,000 Afghans migrated to cities in Azad Kashmir. According to a 2011 article in The News International, Afghans and other foreigners in Azad Kashmir were perceived as a security risk.

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Aryan Khan, a TV personality in Afghanistan, lived in Pakistan. Although most Afghans live in refugee camps near the Pakistan-Afghan border and have little contact with Pakistani society and culture, some travel to nearby cities for work or other purposes. Afghans who migrated to Pakistan in the aftermath of the Soviet invasion are settled in the country and would face socioeconomic problems in moving back to Afghanistan, including difficulty finding shelter and jobs. Second- and third-generation refugees, born and raised in Pakistan, would be unable to easily assimilate in Afghanistan.

Afghans who settle in Pakistan is relatively minor. Many Afghans born and raised in Pakistan identify as Pakistani, and refer to Pakistan as their home. They participate in national festivities and other occasions, including Independence Day celebrations. Afghan communities retain and preserve their cultural values, traditions and customs, despite years of fighting and difficult socioeconomic conditions in Afghanistan. Shared Pashtun and other cultures in the two countries make it easier for Afghans to feel comfortable in Pakistan. At least 71 percent of registered Afghans had no formal education, and only 20 percent were in the labour market.

Despite economic hardships and challenges in Pakistan, many Afghans are unwilling to return in the near future and cite security concerns and the lack of housing and jobs in Afghanistan. Peshawar, 12,000 Afghan nationals were in business without paying taxes. To address these concerns, the Federal Board of Revenue implemented measures to tax Afghan traders. Afghanistan national cricket team are former refugees. Afghans living in Pakistan are vulnerable to persecution, and are often targeted by Pakistani authorities. Several Afghans were arrested by the Federal Investigation Agency at a passport office in Lahore involved in issuing fraudulent Pakistani CNICs and passports.

According to sources, Afghan immigrants could pay as much as Rs150,000 to Rs200,000 to obtain Pakistani nationality documents. Issuing CNICs to the remaining registered Afghan nationals residing in Pakistan, many of which were born inside Pakistan, has been debated. They have overstayed their welcome, scattered across our cities and taken up our jobs”. US Army soldiers intercept illegal lumber smuggled through Kunar Province in Afghanistan into neighboring Pakistan. Smuggling became a major business after the establishment of the Durand Line in 1893, which is now controlled by a large organized-crime network on both sides of the border. The drugs trade and opium production in Afghanistan have taken a toll on Pakistan.

Another form of smuggling is human trafficking. 10,000 to Pakistani human smugglers in Karachi. Afghan militants sometimes enter Pakistan’s border regions for shelter. Pakistan has long sheltered Afghan refugees against Pakistan. There will be complete restriction on the movement of Afghan refugees in Balochistan and KP. We have given a one-month deadline to illegal immigrants to get their refugee cards.

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Pakistani authorities cracked down on Afghan refugee settlements to apprehend illegal immigrants. At least 30,000 Afghans left for Afghanistan, of whom nearly 2,000 were deported due to a lack of legal documentation. Independence Day: We are Pakistanis now, say Afghans”. PAKISTAN: Tolerance wanes as perceptions of Afghan refugees change”.

Afghans, Page 12

Summary of Legal Assistance and Aid Programme”. No more visa extensions for foreigners in Pakistan”. The principal cities of Afghanistan are Kabul, the capital, Ghuznee, Peshawer, and Kandahar. Afghan Refugees in Pakistan at Risk”. Afghanistan Crisis: Regional Implications and Impact on Pakistan’s Polity Archived 2011-11-22 at the Wayback Machine.

NADRA Asks Afghans to Renew PoR Cards before Deadline”. German foreign minister explores situation of Afghans in Pakistan”. United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. Over 350,000 Afghans repatriate from Pakistan before winter”. Returnees to be allotted plots: Helmand governor”.

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Afghanistan: Winter break for voluntary returns from Pakistan”. Afghans face mass deportation from Pakistan”. 48 towns to be established for Afghan refugees: Anwari”. Over 60,000 refugees return home this year”. Nearly 83,000 Afghan refugees return home from Pakistan this year, 2012-12-05.

Why Is Pakistan Expelling Afghan Refugees? Three million Afghans to be expelled by December”. KARACHI: UN body, police baffled by minister’s threat against Afghan refugees, Dawn. Pakistan asks Afghans to go back or shift to camp”. Some 3,000 Afghan refugees to leave Islamabad slum for new home”. Archived from the original on 6 May 2017.

Azad Kashmir to expel 11,000 Afghans: police”. Authorities launch report on registered Afghans in Pakistan”. Pakistan offers scholarships to hundreds of Afghans”. Pakistan: Taliban threaten co-educational schools  RAWA”. 100,000 Afghan carpet-weavers work in Pakistan”. Afghan refugees in Karachi face trifecta of woes”.

FBR to tax Afghan traders working in Pakistan”. SCCI welcomes FBR’s decision to tax Afghan traders”. Afghan families flee persecution in Pakistan after school attack: IOM”. Archived from the original on January 7, 2012.

Refugees Are Pushed to Exits in Pakistan”. BNP rejects census in Afghan refugees’ presence”. Afghanistan, Pakistan move toward prisoner exchange”. Dual nationality: 278 Afghans held for possessing Pak CNICs”. Passport office raided: FIA arrests 11 Afghans”.

Extreme measures: ‘Go Afghani Go’ campaign launched in Haripur”. Action against Afghan refugees on the cards”. Archived from the original on 2013-02-11. Pakistan blames Afghan refugees for Rabbani’s murder”. Policy rethink: Government to redraw key pacts with US”. 246 Taliban arrested from hospitals within a month”. The Gem Hunter: The Adventures of an American in Afghanistan.

To launch this plan, Bhutto recruited and trained a group of Afghans in the Bala-Hesar of Peshawar, in Pakistan’s North-west Frontier Province. Manawan attack: Afghan jailed for 10 years”. DG Khan shrine bombing: Death toll reaches 50″. PAF base attack planned in Afghanistan: DG ISPR”. 10 madrassah students arrested in Lahore before being trafficked to Kabul”. Taliban moving to Quetta from FATA”. 30,000 Afghans left Pakistan after Army Public School attack: IOM”.

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Jump to navigation Jump to search This article is about the “citizens of Afghanistan”. For others, see List of Pashtuns. This article needs additional citations for verification. The following is a list of notable Afghan people, which includes all the ethnic groups of the modern state of Afghanistan. Afghanistan has gone through territorial changes.

This is a dynamic list and may never be able to satisfy particular standards for completeness. An Afghan Shapes Metal and Hard Poetry”. Peace Through Business Network’s Profile Photo Peace Through Business Network”. Archived from the original on 2016-12-20. Sometimes different crochet afghans start to seem not all that different anymore. Colors and patterns begin to blend together after looking at them for too long. If you’re in need of something to inspire you to pick up your hooks again, check out some of these 19 Jaw Dropping Crochet Afghans.

Each project on this list has something unique to offer, whether it’s a certain type of stitch, a unique color scheme, or simply a one-of-a-kind combination of both. Sometimes you just get stuck in a rut with crocheting and nothing strikes your fancy. These crochet blanket patterns will definitely help you break that standstill and hop back on the wagon again. You won’t believe how genuinely beautiful some of these crochet afghans are! What do you like to do to shake things up when you’re in a crochet rut?

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From easy crochet afghan patterns to complex Tunisian crochet patterns, we find and deliver the best free crochet patterns from all over the web. Plus, we feature free product reviews and giveaways of all the latest and greatest products including yarn, crochet books, totes, and more. I’m looking for a plaid crochet afghan pattern not made in strips. I made one about 10 years ago and misplaced the pattern. These are all links to a single crochet pattern site which gives links to the actual page with the pattern. When I saw this post, I thought it would show a picture of the pattern and then provide the link to the actual pattern.

I was disappointed to find a list of links rather than a list of the patterns and what makes them different from all the others with links to the instructions. But I still find them helpful. Now I know how to make a basic granny square. Unwind – A Prime Publishing LLC property. At least twenty four militants were killed or wounded during the operations in northern Kunduz province of Afghanistan, the Afghan military said Thursday. The supporters of Junbish Milli party have closed several government offices during the 17th day of their protests which are being staged in support of a top commander of the party Nizamuddin Qaisari who was arrested by the security forces in Faryab province. Enter the characters you see below Sorry, we just need to make sure you’re not a robot.

Enter the characters you see below Sorry, we just need to make sure you’re not a robot. This article possibly contains original research. This article is about Afghan immigrants in Pakistan. It is not to be confused with the Pashtuns of Pakistan. The first wave of Afghan refugees to Pakistan began during the Soviet war in Afghanistan in the late 1970s. By the end of 2001, there were over four million.

Most have returned to Afghanistan since 2002. The UNHCR reported in February 2017 that about 1. They are primarily Afghanistan’s Pashtuns, followed by Tajiks, Hazaras, Uzbeks, Baloch and Turkmen. The border between Afghanistan and Pakistan is the Durand Line. Afghans have migrated from Afghanistan to what is now Pakistan since at least the times of the Ghaznavids in the 10th century. Interaction and migration by the region’s native people were common.

During the 1980s Soviet war in Afghanistan, many Afghans left their country. After the September 11 attacks, when US-led forces began bombing al-Qaeda and Taliban targets in Afghanistan, a small number of Afghans fled into Pakistan. 3 million Afghans were repatriated from Pakistan through the UNHCR since March 2002. In 2005 the government of Pakistan began registering Afghans, and the number of registered Afghans was reported at 2. More than 357,000 Afghans were repatriated from Pakistan in 2007, and Afghans were repatriated between March and October of each subsequent year.

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In June 2010 Pakistan ratified the United Nations Convention against Torture, which forbids member states from deporting, extraditing or returning people where there is reason to believe they will be tortured. Between 2010 and the end of 2012, a reported 229,000 Afghan refugees returned from Pakistan. Some Pakistani officials have estimated that 400,000 non-registered Afghans may be living in their country. A total of 380,884 Afghan refugees left Pakistan for Afghanistan in 2016. Most were born and raised in Pakistan, but are still counted as citizens of Afghanistan. 3 million registered Afghans still remained in Pakistan.

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A number of Afghan passport holders travel to Pakistan with a visa for a variety of reasons, including family visits, business, medical purposes, sport competitions, education, tourism, or to visit foreign embassies. Since the 1980s, Afghans and Pakistanis were accustomed to crossing the border between their countries without passports or visas. In March 2012, Pakistan ended its visa-extension program. Karim Sadiq of the Afghanistan national cricket team lived in Pakistan. Hasti Gul, another member of the Afghanistan national cricket team, lived in Peshawar.

Eighty-five percent of Afghan refugees in Pakistan are Pashtuns, and the remaining 15 percent are Uzbeks, Tajiks and members of other ethnic groups. During the 1980s Soviet war in Afganistan, Peshawar was a center for Afghan refugees. Most Afghans in Quetta are engaged in business and work in the city. Balochistan shares demographics with Afghanistan, and many refugees have migrated to the province for ethnic links. The first wave of Afghan Hazaras arrived during the 1980s Soviet war, and more arrived fleeing persecution by the Taliban regime in the 1990s. According to the UNHCR and local law enforcement, about 50,000 Afghan refugees lived in Sindh in 2009.

A UNHCR spokesman said, “Sindh is home to some 50,000 Afghan refugees and most of them are staying in Karachi”. Before 2006 about 25,000 Afghans lived in a refugee camp in the Islamabad Capital Territory. The camp was closed, its refugees relocated and 7,335 Afghans were reportedly living in Rawalpindi. An estimated 150,000 Afghans live in Pakistan’s Punjab province. During the 1980s, about 13,000 Afghans migrated to cities in Azad Kashmir. According to a 2011 article in The News International, Afghans and other foreigners in Azad Kashmir were perceived as a security risk.

Aryan Khan, a TV personality in Afghanistan, lived in Pakistan. Although most Afghans live in refugee camps near the Pakistan-Afghan border and have little contact with Pakistani society and culture, some travel to nearby cities for work or other purposes. Afghans who migrated to Pakistan in the aftermath of the Soviet invasion are settled in the country and would face socioeconomic problems in moving back to Afghanistan, including difficulty finding shelter and jobs. Second- and third-generation refugees, born and raised in Pakistan, would be unable to easily assimilate in Afghanistan.

Afghans who settle in Pakistan is relatively minor. Many Afghans born and raised in Pakistan identify as Pakistani, and refer to Pakistan as their home. They participate in national festivities and other occasions, including Independence Day celebrations. Afghan communities retain and preserve their cultural values, traditions and customs, despite years of fighting and difficult socioeconomic conditions in Afghanistan. Shared Pashtun and other cultures in the two countries make it easier for Afghans to feel comfortable in Pakistan.

At least 71 percent of registered Afghans had no formal education, and only 20 percent were in the labour market. Despite economic hardships and challenges in Pakistan, many Afghans are unwilling to return in the near future and cite security concerns and the lack of housing and jobs in Afghanistan. Peshawar, 12,000 Afghan nationals were in business without paying taxes. To address these concerns, the Federal Board of Revenue implemented measures to tax Afghan traders.